MINUTE
BLUFFER’S
GUIDE TO

 


...

 



POSTERS,
PRINTS,
FRAMED ART &
 
CANVASES

Home

Artists
Salvador Dali
Wassily Kandinsky
Paul Klee
Gustav Klimt
Joan Miro
Piet Mondrian
Jackson Pollock
Andy Warhol

Art Movements
Pop Art
Cubism
Abstract
Expressionism

Dadaism
Symbolism

Click on an artist
above to buy art or
read ‘bluffer’s guide’
& longer biography


BIOGRAPHY

1

BUY

A R TPOSTERS        A R TBIOGRAPHIES        A R TPRINTS        A R TBLUFFER        A R TSHOP   A R TFOR SALE   

ARTGENIUS.co.uk
CLICK PICTURE ABOVE
TO BUY - OR TO JUST
BROWSE THROUGH
MUCH MORE FOR
SALE BY THE SAME
GREAT ARTIST
SALE NOW ON

Piet Mondrian was born into an artistic family in Holland in 1872. His father gave him traditional drawing lessons and his uncle Frits was a successful painter his own right. His father wanted Piet to become an art teacher rather than an artist so that he would have a safe job and be able to make a living. Then as now, being an artist was not seen as a safe career option.


He did indeed start off on a conventional path and qualified as an art teacher, but not long afterwards he decided to take his chances as an artist. His uncle Frits was well connected and managed to get him a place at the expensive National Academy of Art in Amsterdam. He first exhibited his work aged 21 a year after enrolling at the Academy.
 

He travelled Holland and painted landscapes and trees. Piet Mondrian’s trees however, became more and more abstract.

 

Shown above,  Piet Mondrian “Trees”

 

He began leaving out detail he considered unnecessary to the painting. The more abstract he became the more popular he was with the avant garde art set. Conversely he was criticised heavily by the Dutch art critics who described him as ‘confused’.

 

Like a modern day pop star he reinvented himself more than once and broke from his traditional Protestant upbringing to join the Theosophical movement in 1909. He meditated and lived a lifestyle common amongst the arty set at the time. At this time he was bearded and scruffy and he dressed informally. Later he changed again to be clean shaven and dress in sharp suits.

These changes of personal dress reflected his painting styles at the time.

 

Moving from a love and respect for natural organic forms and landscapes he painted more and more abstract imagery. Finally distilling this into painting horizontal and vertical lines.

 

The horizontal lines represented femininity and the worldly, the vertical lines represented masculinity and spirituality. He aimed to achieve a balance between the two, in harmony with his new spiritual beliefs which were central to his art.

 

In Amsterdam in 1911 he saw a cubist exhibition featuring Picasso and Braque which inspired him to move to Paris in 1912. He threw himself into the Paris life, the parties, the dancing and the artistic freedom. He gained huge artistic acclaim although he actually sold very little of his own work and made a living making copies of great works in the Louvre.

 

His father became seriously ill at the outbreak of World War I and Mondrian returned to Holland. He met fellow artists exiled in Holland during the war years including Theo Van Doesburg who co-founded the De Stijl (the style) movement in 1917. Modrian joined De Stijl and became a leading light, he is the movements most famous artist. De Stijl’s philosophy was that artists could create a better world by producing art that would be in harmony with nature. They postulated that if art was in tune spiritually then that would create a paradise on earth. In writings for the de Stijl Magazine in 1920, Mondrian called his style Neo-Plasticism.The De Stijl movement had a great influence on The Bauhaus in Germany later on.

 

Mondrian wrote a series of articles called “De Nieuwe Beelding in de schilderkunst” (“The New Plastic in Painting”) during 1917 and 1918. His father had died in 1915 and Mondrian returned to Paris after the war. Here he published a book called ‘Le Neo-Plasticisme’.

 

In the 1920’s, he produced a series of ‘lozenge’ paintings, square canvasses which could be hung in a diamond shape.

 

In the 30’s Hitler announced that Mondrian’s art was degenerate and Mondrian took this as a warning. As the Nazis advanced he fled Paris for London in 1938. He’d previously met American artist Harry Holtzman in Paris in 1934 and when the Nazi’s threatened to invade England in 1940, he moved to New York with Holtzman’s help.

 

In 1944 Mondrian died of pneumonia in a hospital in New York.

 

 

His striking geometric shapes were used in fashion, especially in the 1960’s and are still an influence to this day.

 

Piet Mondrian paintings are amongst the best selling prints, posters and canvases gracing living rooms, bedrooms and offices the world over. We hope you’ve enjoyed our facts about Piet Mondrian and we’ve inspired you to own some Piet Mondrian art for yourself.

PIET MONDRIAN

PIET
MONDRIAN

1

Born Holland in 1872 died in new York in 1944

2

Neo Plasticism

3

Lived in Holland, moved to Paris in 1912

4

Early work consisted of traditional depictions of trees and landscapes, these Piet  Mondrian trees and landscapes became more and more abstract

5

Leading theorist and co founder of the influential De Stijl (The Style) movement

6

Lozenge canvasses. Square and could be hung in a diamond shape on the wall

7

Always trying to create art in harmony with his strong spiritual beliefs

8

Horizontal lines represented female and worldly attributes and vertical lines represented the male and spirituality. His aim was to create a balance between the two

9

Reinvented himself and changed his image along with his paintings, moving from a hippy look to a sharp suited city banker look

10

Hitler called his paintings “degenerate”

 

PIETMONDRIAN

10 fast and fab facts about Piet Mondrian

Facts about Piet Mondrian
Buy at Art.com
L'arbre, 1908
Buy From Art.com